November 29, 2011

How to Prevent Hair Loss for Men

Hair loss can affect up to sixty percent of men at some point in their life and can have multiple causes. Through causes like aging, a lack of nutrition and vitamins as well as causes like hormonal imbalances there are many reasons that could cause a man to lose his hair.

Preventing hair loss can be simple with the many methods and processes that have been designed for men with the latest technology. Preventing hair loss can be costly, but many men are willing to pay to ensure that they are able to retain the full head of hair for as long as possible into their mature years. As well, advancements have made it possible for men suffering from premature hair loss to overcome the hair loss and therefore increase the vitality and youthful appearance, regardless of the age of the man experiencing hair loss.

What are some methods that can be used to prevent hair loss in men? Use these methods to reduce the effects of hair loss:

- Medications can be an effective way to prevent hair loss for men. There are many medications that are available

- Ensuring that you maintain a proper diet can be an effective way to ensure that you are able to maintain the head of hair. Using supplements and vitamins to ensure proper nutrition can be an effective way to ensure that you are able to maintain the head of hair. Ensuring that there are combinations of fruits, vegetables and whole grains as well as omega fatty acids can be the most effective way to ensure that you are able to reduce the hair loss that can occur with age.

-  Maintain healthy collagen levels within the skin and the hair through foods that can boost collagen as well as products that can ensure that you are able to maintain the moisture through the scalp as well as through the skin.

- Use treatments that can stop hair loss once it has begun. Through the use of hair transplants and other types of treatments to replace the hair that has been lost you can ensure that you are able to prevent the hair loss that can occur with age.

- Shampoos and other types of treatments which are applied directly to the scalp and meant to reduce the appearance of hair loss by causing the hair to appear thicker in appearance are effective ways to increase hair growth in men.

Using these methods to reduce hair loss in men can be an effective way to maintain the self esteem, as well as an effective way to ensure that you are able to retain a youthful, as well as healthy appearance.

Taking advantage of the many new technologies including laser treatments which can encourage re-growth through the follicle of the hair as well as taking advantage of methods like transplants that can also root the hair within the area where hair loss is being experienced and therefore reduce the appearance of hair loss through the head.

Prostate Cancer Signs

Learning about the signs and symptoms that are associated with prostate cancer can be an effective way to take the best case of prevention and early treatment of the common type of cancer in men over fifty years of age.

There are many signs that are associated with prostate cancer you should be aware of – especially in the case that you are at increased risk.

Here are some of the signs and symptoms that should be watched for in the case that you fall under the

- Difficulty stopping urination or starting urination is one of the main symptoms that is associated with prostate cancer. In most cases, the patient feels the urge to urinate but they are unable to product any urine. In other cases, the patient is unable to stop the flow of urination once it has begun or they experience dribbling of the urine even after the flow has stopped.

- Any pain that is associated with urination is a common indicator of an enlarged prostate which can be associated with prostate cancer.

- Blood in the urine, or blood in the semen can be an indication of prostate cancer and should not be taken lightly. It is important to see a physician promptly in the case that there is blood in the urine or blood in the semen.

- Frequent urination can be one of the symptoms that are associated with prostate cancer or other symptoms of prostate cancer, including an enlarged prostate. This can often occur through the night and cause disruptions within the sleep patterns. As this occurs through the night, this is often one of the trigger symptoms that men notice and this causes them to seek medical attention.

- Pain that can occur through the hips and lower back are often associated with an enlarged prostate as well as being associated with prostate cancer. Unexplained pain and tenderness through these areas are often signs of trouble when they are combined with the various other signs and symptoms which are associated with prostate problems.

- Difficulty maintaining an erection. As well as difficulty maintaining an erection, many men find that they cannot obtain the erection in the first place because of the enlarged prostate.

Knowing the symptoms that are associated with prostate cancer is the main aspect of taking part in early treatment that can help to reduce the implications on the body.

As well as the signs and symptoms, it is important to be aware of the risk factors that can be seen for prostate cancer. Learning the risk factors enable you to associate signs and symptoms with the appropriate risk factor.

- Being overweight

– Consuming a high-fat diet

– Family history of Prostate Cancer

– Being African American Descent

– Smoking

– Being over the age of fifty

It is important to undergo screening in the case that you are in any of the groups that are considered high risk, as well as in the case that you are experiencing any of the signs and symptoms that are associated with prostate cancer.

A simple rectal exam and blood test are two measures which can help to screen for prostate cancer and allow for early detection in the case of positive results for cancer cells.

Safeguard Your Heart

heartThe latest findings on heart disease are nothing unexpected: It’s the number one killer of American men, claiming a life about every 30 seconds. Most young, fit guys shuffle statistics like these into a mental file titled, “Doesn’t apply to me.” But no matter how old (or young) you are, the only way to stay on top of your game is to know your risk factors and take the right steps to avoid problems down the road. We talked with two heart experts to find out everything you need to know to guarantee your ticker stays stronger longer.

In Your 20s

“There’s a common problem among men in their twenties,” says Dr. Eric Topel, M.D., director of Scripps Translational Science Institute. “They don’t know they’re vulnerable [to heart disease].” Your twenties are the prefect time to establish heart-healthy diet and exercise habits that’ll extend your expiration date. That means 30 minutes of exercise five times a week and maintaining a healthy weight and cholesterol level—LDL below 160 mg/dL, HDL of at least 40 mg/dL, and a triglyceride level below 199 mg/dL, according to Dr. Topel.

Every 20-something average Joe needs an annual physical to evaluate HDL and LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting lipid profile, blood pressure, and family history. If the checkup goes well, one appointment is enough to clear your conscious. But if you’re an athlete or you hit the weight room more than five times a week, ask your doctor for an echocardiogram to ensure you don’t have a heart abnormality,” says Dr. John Elefteriades, M.D., the chief of cardiothoracic surgery at Yale University.

“If you have a silent aneurism (one that doesn’t cause you to feel symptoms), you’re susceptible to internal splitting of the aorta,” Dr. Elefteriades says. An echocardiogram is the only way to detect this problem. The test also spots dilated cardiomyopathy (a condition of heart failure in which the heart gets stretched too big and too thin) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (an inherited condition where the heart muscle is overgrown).

Your 20s Checklist:

  • 30 minutes of exercise five times a week
  • Annual physicals
  • Echocardiogram
  • Cholesterol: LDL less than 160 mg/dL and HDL greater than 40 mg/dL
  • Blood pressure: 119/79 mm HG or lower
  • Lipid profile: Triglycerides less than 199 mg/dL

In Your 30s

Although most heart conditions are strongly hereditary, they don’t always manifest as early as your twenties, Dr. Elefteriades said. So along with your standard health check, schedule another echocardiogram 10 years after the first one—especially if you’re regularly weight lifting, wrestling, playing football, or participating in any sport with short bursts of activity.

Men older than 35 should also have an electrocardiogram (EKG), which traces the electrical waves of the heart, every 5 years. This test will show evidence of hardening of the heart’s arteries (arthrosclerosis)—a preventable and treatable condition that restricts blood flow and may cause a blood clot.

Your 30s Checklist:

  • 30 minutes of exercise five times a week
  • Annual physicals
  • Echocardiogram, 10 years after the first
  • Electrocardiogram (EKG), if older than 35
  • Cholesterol: LDL less than 160 mg/dL and HDL greater than 40 mg/dL
  • Blood pressure: 119/79 mm HG or lower
  • Lipid profile: Triglycerides less than 199 mg/dL

In Your 40s

When you hit 40, your doctor should start monitoring the overall degree of inflammation within your body with C-reactive protein (CRP) testing. The higher your CRP level, the higher your risk of cardiovascular disease. But there’s no need to make an extra appointment for this one—the same simple blood test that checks your cholesterol levels measures CRP levels. The best way to keep CRP levels in check? Regular exercise.

Your 40s Checklist:

  • 30 minutes of exercise five times a week
  • Annual physicals
  • Echocardiogram, 10 years after your last one
  • EKG, 5 years after your last one
  • Cholesterol: LDL less than 160 mg/dL and HDL greater than 40 mg/dL
  • Blood pressure: 119/79 mm HG or lower
  • Lipid profile: Triglycerides less than 199 mg/dL
  • C-reactive protein: Less than 1 mg per liter

In Your 50s

Fifty is the typical age men develop coronary heart disease, according to Dr. Topel. The prevention prescription? An exercise stress test. This test, sometimes called a treadmill test, monitors how well your heart handles work. As you walk or pedal on an exercise machine, the electrical activity of your heart and your blood pressure are measured. As your body works harder during the test, it requires more oxygen, so the heart must pump more blood.

The test will pick up subtle arteriosclerosis (blockage of the coronary arteries), and determine the cause of any chest pain and the exercise capacity of your heart. A stress test isn’t a necessary for men younger than fifty unless you have a strong family history of heart disease, according to Dr. Elefteriades.

Your 50s Checklist:

  • 30 minutes of exercise five times a week
  • Annual physicals
  • Echocardiogram, 10 years after your last one
  • EKG, 5 years after your last one
  • Exercise stress test
  • Cholesterol: LDL less than 160 mg/dL and HDL greater than 40 mg/dL
  • Blood pressure: 119/79 mm HG or lower
  • Lipid profile: Triglycerides less than 199 mg/dL
  • C-reactive protein: Less than 1 mg per liter

At Every Age

If you experience chest pain or shortness of breath due to exertion, get to the hospital right away. These are the two primary symptoms of heart disease and should never go unchecked. “Men are deniers,” Dr. Elefteriades says. “It’s usually someone else in their lives—wife, girlfriend, mom—that forces them to confront symptoms.” Other warning signs to speak up about are light-headedness and heart palpitations (an abnormal heart beat).